A Message to Teenagers,

by Paula Perron

For some time now, I have listened to news reports that the teenage group are not only carriers of Covid 19, but are also candidates for acquiring this virus, and parents feel their teen is not taking it seriously. I remember when I was a teen, I too felt the world was mine for the taking—that I was infallible, and I was living in the present, and my parents were living in the past. It was after I grew older, that I learned how to be more humble, and more compassionate. I do sympathize with parents who constantly stress the dangers of passing on this virus and who leave the discussion without satisfaction. At this time, all teens should listen, and all parents should not give up. I humbly ask parents not to stop teaching, speaking, and being the best parents you can be, for your teen will recognize the danger.

LISTEN TEENS BELIEVE: It is real…You can pass it on —you can catch Covid 19, and you may lose someone you love.

A LIMERICK FOR TEENS
  • THERE ONCE WAS A TEEN STUCK AT HOME
  • WHO STILL WANTED TO ROAM
  • AND WENT HERE AND THERE
  • WITHOUT ANY CARE
  • ENDING UP IN A CATACOMB 
 

 

Preview(opens in a new tab)

TOO MUCH ADVICE?

                                                                       

                                               IS IT GOOD OR BAD ADVICE?

In the latest issue of “Writers Digest” is an article by Jeff Somers, I had to pass on to my readers. I can only cover some of his topics due to the length.

As writers, we carefully edit our manuscript, correcting any mistakes, and pay special attention to correct punctuation, wording, etc. before releasing it for publication.  Many of us, including myself, seek the opinions of friends, family, authors, and volunteers willing to read the novel, as the last check before submission.

In addition to the opinions of my family and friends, I read everything I found by those I considered authorities, but I was confused and conflicted about different interpretations of the same advice. In the back of my head was the same question until I read this wonderful Article.

QUESTION: When is it okay to NOT follow the advice given you by others, Read below what Jeff  Somers wrote about “THE RULES’.

  1. WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW:  Write what you know was not meant to reject your imagination.  You can write about stuff you know nothing about— just write a story you want to read.
  • SHOW DON’T TELL: When showing injects unnecessary verbosity, don’t.  That rule implies that “telling” is Lazy, while showing takes real talent. You need to balance the showing and the telling, 
  • WRITE EVERY DAY:  The discipline of working regularly is good and stops you from being one of those who talks about writing but never does. But, not all can write every day.  Think of it as a goal, not a requirement.
  • KILL YOUR DARLINGS:It is probably the most misunderstood and misapplied piece of writing advice in the history of writing. Don’t delete writing you like and never look back.
  • INVEST IN A THESAURUS: Having a large vocabulary as an author is great—but it’s only half the battle. You need to feel comfortable, and your word choices should fit your characters.
  • NEVER WRITE A PROLOGUE:The implication is that you are an amateur. In reality it is possible to pull off a prologue, but you need purpose.
  • AVOID THE PASSIVE VOICE: Yes, it is grammatically correct, and we are told it is lazy writing. However, there are forms of passive that are acceptable and necessary.

 I hope the above encourages you to subscribe to this wonderful magazine and read the entire article.

Happy writing, Paula